Your browser doesn't support the features required by this theme, instead you're presented with a simplified version. You may view this blog by its archive.

For the best experience please use the latest version of Chrome, Firefox or Safari with javascript enabled.

More information and support can be found at Untitled Themes.

For a spell, the film gets by on its unpretentious flair for atmosphere, even its disconcerting nonsensicality. But then the story shifts to 2008, then to 1998, and finally back to the present, each leap in time a puzzle piece meant to clarify why people keep going missing on the road and, less successfully, the psychic headspace that’s shared by both the living and the dead. In the light of day, not only does it become unmistakable that Yam Laranas’s style largely consists of references to directors with better moves, but that his story is fixated on the sort of retrograde psychoanalysis that went out with the last scene of Hitchcock’s Psycho.

- Ed Gonzales (Slant Magazine) on Yam Laranas’ THE ROAD.

If you see the ghost, click it for full article.

For a spell, the film gets by on its unpretentious flair for atmosphere, even its disconcerting nonsensicality. But then the story shifts to 2008, then to 1998, and finally back to the present, each leap in time a puzzle piece meant to clarify why people keep going missing on the road and, less successfully, the psychic headspace that’s shared by both the living and the dead. In the light of day, not only does it become unmistakable that Yam Laranas’s style largely consists of references to directors with better moves, but that his story is fixated on the sort of retrograde psychoanalysis that went out with the last scene of Hitchcock’s Psycho.

- Ed Gonzales (Slant Magazine) on Yam Laranas’ THE ROAD.

If you see the ghost, click it for full article.

2 years ago - Source: slantmagazine.com - 2 notes

de facto ray

Hint: Use your left and right arrow keys to move between posts.